Alvin Ailey Dancers Do Their Own Makeup for Performances | Interviews


“I use the Urban Decay Setting Spray, which I think is best for me because I just spritz it on my eyes and then I fan it in with my hands so that it really sets in,” King adds. 

Backstage, the dancers usually only have around 30 minutes to do their makeup, so simplicity is key. King loves small winged eyeliner looks to get performance-ready on the quick. “I just think about taking the tips of where my eyes end, and then just drawing diagonally up,” she says. “I bring it up from the top of my eyeball, in, as opposed to trying to wing it from the eye out — I go from the outside, in.”

When it comes time to do her liner, Richardson says she uses MAC Liquid Last, which is a product she’s loved since her teens. “Back in the day, especially during high school — I guess I was crying a lot back then — I started using [it],” she explains. “That does not come off, at all. You can wear it for a week, it does not come off.”

Milk Makeup Hydro Grip Setting + Refreshing Spray

Image may contain: Cosmetics

Urban Decay All Nighter Long-Lasting Setting Spray

How Dancers Get Their Feet Sandal-Ready

“Dancers are known for the worst feet,” Lancaster puts it bluntly. They deal with cracks, calluses, cuts, and the type of wear-and-tear you expect from jumping around for a living. So what do they suggest we do to our own plebeian feet when it comes time to wear sandals this summer?

“Honestly, it’s a bunch of Vaseline and Jergens,” Lancaster says. “I don’t want to put that on before the show because it’ll make the stage slippery, and we want a good hard callus when I’m turning all the time, but after, that I slap the Vaseline on there and just keep rubbing and massaging the feet.”

King goes for antibiotic creams that help prevent infection in cracked heels or split toes. “That helps it stay moisturized and protected,” she says.

Elijah Lancaster during a performance. 

Nir Arieli 

How to Avoid Ponytail Headaches

Richardson says her biggest hack for ponytail headaches — you know, how your forehead feels after you’ve slicked your hair back for hours — isn’t really a hack at all. “I try to release my hair during lunch breaks and when I’m not performing,” she admits. “I take lots of Advil.”



Source link

Leave a Comment